Buried Alive Screaming In The Night: German POW Survivors Describe the red Russian Commie No Combat Coward Eisenhower’s Extermination Camps After WWII Had Ended

Treasonous mass murdering red Russian Khazarian who betrayed his host country to the zionist Zombie Virus. Sorry, I don’t like Ike. Neither did cousin Gorgie in the end. Gen. Patton said Ike would whine it was hard making decisions when he had never been in combat. Gorgie said as Ike was “supreme commander” the only thing standing between Ike & Combat experience, was Ike’s Cowardliness.

By John Wear
One night in April 1945, I was startled out of my stupor in the rain and the mud by piercing screams and loud groans… I saw this bulldozer moving forward through the crowd of prisoners who lay there. In the front it had a blade making a pathway. How many of the prisoners were buried alive in their earth holes…

A similar incident occurred at the American camp at Rheinberg in mid-June 1945… the last act of the Americans at Rheinberg before the British took over was to bulldoze one section of the camp level while there were still living men in their holes in the ground.

On July 27, 1929, the Allies extended the Protective Regulations of the Geneva Convention for Wounded Soldiers to include prisoners of war (POWs). These regulations state: “All accommodations should be equal to the standard of their troops. The Red Cross supervises. After the end of the hostilities the POWs should be released immediately.” On March 10, 1945, Dwight Eisenhower, the Supreme Allied Commander of the Allied Expeditionary Force, disregarded these regulations by classifying German prisoners captured on German territory as “Disarmed Enemy Forces” (DEFs). The German prisoners were therefore at the mercy of the Allies and were not protected by international law. [i]

The Western Allies deliberately murdered approximately 1 million disarmed German POWs by means of starvation, exposure, and illness. This Allied atrocity was first publicly exposed in 1989 in the book Other Losses by James Bacque. Bacque estimates in Other Losses that the victims undoubtedly number over 790,000, almost certainly over 900,000, and quite likely over a million. The prisoners’ deaths were knowingly caused by army officers who had sufficient resources to keep these prisoners alive. Relief organizations such as the Red Cross that attempted to help prisoners in the American camps were refused permission by the army. [ii]

The vast U.S. camps in open fields stretched for 10 kilometers along the Rhine river. The men were denied access to the river only a few meters away. For no cost and with little effort the Americans could have provided the disarmed German POWs access to the Rhine river for drinking and sanitation purposes. Images

“Did they not know all children under the age of 5 must die?” This was stated by a British doctor attending to the Boer women and children held in the concentration camps of the 2nd Anglo-Boer war. Not Auschwitz. (Read here). In stark contrast the Auschwitz labor camp provided inmates, at great cost and effort, with modern facilities including a maternity ward and nursery to care for the thousands of babies born during the war. Read more here. Pictured above healthy babies in the Auschwitz nursery in 1942, before the Dresden-style carpet bombing of Germany destroyed vital supply lines and infrastructure with devastating affects on all civilians. Furthermore, the German POWs in Eisenhower’e extermination camps were soldiers from the front line, not camp guards. They were neither tried nor convicted by the Nuremberg trials for war crimes before their deaths.
Germans Testify to the Eisenhower POW Extermination Camps
Surviving German prisoners have provided testimony of the horrific conditions and mistreatment they received in the Allied prisoner of war (POW) camps. Many surviving German prisoners were badly mistreated even before arriving at the Allied camps. Werner Wilhelm Laska, a German prisoner of war, reports his transfer to an American prison camp:

The American guards who arrived with the truck were nasty and cruel from the start. I was forced in with kicks and punches to my back. Other German soldiers were already on board. After a drive of an hour or two we arrived at an open field on which many servicemen were already assembled, in rank and file. As we got off the truck, a large group of Americans awaited us. They received us with shouts and yells, such as: “You Hitler, you Nazi, etc….” We got beaten, kicked and pushed; one of those gangsters brutally tore my watch from my wrist. Each of these bandits already possessed 10 or 20 watches, rings and other things. The beating continued until I reached the line where my comrades stood. Most of our water-bottles (canteens), rucksacks etc. were cut off, and even overcoats had to be left on the ground. More and more prisoners arrived, including even boys and old men. After a few hours, big trailer-trucks—usually used for transporting cattle—lined up for loading with human cattle.

We had to run the gauntlet to get into the trucks; we were beaten and kicked. Then they jammed us in so tightly that they couldn’t even close the hatches. We couldn’t even breathe. The soldiers drove the vehicles at high speed over the roads and through villages and towns; behind each trailer-truck always followed a jeep with a mounted machine gun.

In late afternoon we stopped in an open field again, and were unloaded in the same manner, with beating and kicking. We had to line up at attention just like recruits in basic training. Quickly, the Americans fenced us in with rolls of barbed wire, so there was no space to sit or to lie down that night. We even had to do our necessities in the standing position. Since we received no water or foodstuffs, our thirst and hunger became acute and urgent. Some men still had tea in their canteens, but there was hardly enough for everyone.

Next day the procedure began as on the day before; running the gauntlet into the cattle-trailers, then transport to the next open field. No drinking and no eating, but always fenced in–there is an American song: “… Don’t fence me in…”–as well as the childish behavior of most of the Americans: Punishing the Nazis! After the first night, when we were loaded again, some of us stayed on that field, either dead or so weak and sick that they could not move any more. We had been approaching the Rhine River, as we noticed, but we had still one night to pass in the manner related. It was terrible!

All this could not have been a coincidence. It must have been a plan, because, as we later learned, there was nearly the same treatment in all camps run by American units. During the war we heard about the “Morgenthau Plan” and the “Kaufman Plan,” and exactly that seemed to have been happening to us in those moments: the extermination of an entire people![1]

More:
http://www.renegadetribune.com/buried-alive-screaming-in-the-night-german-pow-survivors-describe-eisenhowers-extermination-camps-after-wwii-had-ended/

One thought on “Buried Alive Screaming In The Night: German POW Survivors Describe the red Russian Commie No Combat Coward Eisenhower’s Extermination Camps After WWII Had Ended

  1. Lewie Paine says:

    Another dirty secret hidden from the American public.

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