American Monster: Chris Kyle, the American Sniper

There is a difference between a warrior and a killer.
Warrior does not like to kill.
The killer loves to kill.
A true warrior, will be enlightened enough to understand, when one takes life, even in war, even in a justified war, with the warrior on the right side, there is still a price to pay for the shedding of that blood.

A true warrior, like the Jesus the Christ portrayed in the Bible, understands when he goes to war, understands he is taking on the negative energy of the shedding of fellow human blood upon himself, for his people.
Much like Jesus taking the sins of the Hebrews on his shoulders.

A warrior, once the battle is joined, will become himself, he will fight, he will kill with abandon, until he is victorious, then he shows mercy to the Warriors of the losing side.

But the warrior does not after the heat of battle has died, and he has rested, then brag in detail about how he killed this and that human, with glee.
A true warrior, often at night, alone with his thoughts, and in his dreams, see the host he has slain, and he like Jacob, wrestles with an angel at night.
But the Warrior in dreams wrestles with the angel of death.
Part of the job.

It is kind of like the ole Gentlemen do not kiss and tell.

Chris Kyle was a killer who loved killing people who had never attacked his country, not threatened his people, despite what the MSM and the political whores of sodom and Gomorrah on the Potomac told you.

He was certainly no gentleman.

John C Carleton

Are Americans who lap up Chris Kyle’s blood-specked vomit suffering from hybristophilia—groupie-like fanboy adulation of psychopathic serial killers? Danish author and criminologist Soren Korsgaard has edited the peer-reviewed criminology journal Radians and Inches: The Journal of Crime. and currently posts at CrimeAndPower.com. I recently interviewed him about this article HERE. — Kevin Barrett, Veterans Today Editor

American Monster: Chris Kyle, the American Sniper

By Soren Korsgaard

When one delves into the subject of perpetrators of extreme violence, it is very rare for experts and writers to discuss legalized killers, much less study them; instead, they take aim at politically neutral cases, that being non-legalized killers, and consequently the literature in this regard has been based on an incomplete spectrum.

If researchers were able to bypass political undertones and the complexities involved with determining which legalized killers to include and which to discard in their analyses, they would quickly be able to establish that one of the most remorseless and prolific US serial killers of all time is neither named John Wayne Gacy nor Gary Ridgway but Christopher Scott Kyle, the American Sniper.

Chris Kyle, who has been branded an “American Hero [1],” never expressed any regrets for his many victims but stated that he wished he could have murdered more. Even Ted Bundy, who murdered dozens of women and occasionally indulged in necrophilia and decapitations, expressed that he deeply regretted his actions and reckoned that society deserved to be protected from him.

Chris Kyle was a United States Navy SEAL sniper and served several tours in the Iraq War. After his discharge from the U.S. Navy, he went on to publish his bestselling autobiography American Sniper in 2012 [2]. In his book, he claimed to be the most prolific sniper of all time, and it is generally agreed upon that he has killed more than 160 and possibly over 300 people, mostly Iraqis. After the publication of his book, he told the Sunday People that “There are no kills that I regret. None at all. The public is very soft. I either killed them, or they killed other Americans [3].”

In this article, we integrate the case into a broader framework that encompasses a discussion of the legal justification for the war. As we shall see, the Iraq War had been planned years in advance and violated international law. Killings committed during an illegal invasion are obviously illegal and this puts Chris Kyle‘s justification into a whole different perspective; that is, if the USA had never invaded Iraq, none of his colleagues would have ever been in any alleged danger.

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American Monster: Chris Kyle, the American Sniper