Tao

“I would rather roam and idle about in a muddy ditch, at my own amusement, than to be put under the restraints that the ruler would impose. I would never take any official service, and thereby I will be free to satisfy my own purposes…There has been such a thing as letting mankind alone; there has never been such a thing as governing mankind with success. The world does simply not need governing; in fact it should not be governed.”

– Chuang Tzu (369-286 B.C.)

Natural Law, also known as the Laws of the Universe, the Laws of Nature, the Laws of the Prime Creator, Cosmic Law, and God’s Law, is a body of organic Spiritual Laws that is used by Nature to govern everything in the Universe. Without Natural Law, life and reality cannot exist.

Natural Rights is a political theory that maintains that an Individual enters into Society with certain basic rights and that no government can deny these rights. The idea of natural rights grew out of the ancient and medieval doctrines of natural law, i.e., the belief that people, as creatures of nature, should live their lives and organize their society on the basis of rules and precepts laid down by nature and that these laws are basic and fundamental to human nature and are discoverable by human reason.

Natural law is the basis of ethics and morality. (For example, ‘One should treat others as one would like others to treat oneself.’ This concept can be rationally explained from the perspectives of psychology, philosophy, sociology, and economics.)

Natural rights, conferred by natural law, are universal ethical rules developed over thousands of years and are to be found in the commandments of all large religions. (You shall not kill, steal, covet your neighbor’s house, use violence or offer violence against any other person except in self-defense etc.)

These natural rights link to the Non Aggression Principle (NAP), to the respect for personal property, and that all forms of human associations should be based on voluntariness.

A ‘right’ is a moral principle defining and sanctioning a man’s freedom of action in a social context. There is only one fundamental right (all the others are its consequences or corollaries): a man’s right to his own life. Life is a process of self-sustaining and self-generated action; the right to life means the right to engage in self-sustaining and self-generated action—which means: the freedom to take all the actions required by the nature of a rational being for the support, the furtherance, the fulfillment and the enjoyment of his own life. (Such is the meaning of the right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.)

The concept of a ‘right’ pertains only to action—specifically, to freedom of action. It means freedom from physical compulsion, coercion or interference by other men.

Thus, for every individual, a right is the moral sanction of a positive—of his freedom to act on his own judgment, for his own goals, by his own voluntary, uncoerced choice. As to his neighbors, his rights impose no obligations on them except of a negative kind: to abstain from violating his rights.

The right to life is the source of all rights—and the right to property is their only implementation. Without property rights, no other rights are possible. Since man has to sustain his life by his own effort, the man who has no right to the product of his effort has no means to sustain his life. The man who produces while others dispose of his product, is a slave.

Bear in mind that the right to property is a right to action, like all the others: it is not the right to an object, but to the action and the consequences of producing or earning that object. It is not a guarantee that a man will earn any property, but only a guarantee that he will own it if he earns it. It is the right to gain, to keep, to use and to dispose of material values.

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