Confederate Night Before Christmas

i take this from a book written by Mark Vogal, a true Southern Gentleman.

If you would like to have one of the books, i will try to find where they are for sale. Bought mine at a Sons of Confederate Veterans meeting.

This one goes to my oldest grandson tonight, with an inscription of personal family losses in the late war of Southern Genocide at the hands of the evil war criminal United States.

Forget hell!

God bless the memories of my cousins, my great great uncle, died defending against evil invaders in that evil war of northern aggression.

God bless the memory, of General Robert E Lee, a great man, and a true Southern Gentleman.

God bless the memory of each and ever Confederate soldier!

John C Carleton

Confederate Night Before Christmas:

By Mark Vogl

Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the camp
Only a sentry was stirring, it was dark, cold and damp
The Cannons were parked, rifles stacked with such care
In hopes the yankees wouldn’t soon be there
Johnny Rebs were nestled all snug in their tents
While hopes of home danced in their heads
And i in my Kepi had just closed the flap
And settled my brain to study my map
When out in the field there arose such a clatter
i sprang from my desk to see whats the matter
Away to the sentry post, i flew like a flash
In such a dog gone hurry, i lost my red sash
The moon on the crest of the new fallen snow
Gave the luster of midday to objects below
When what did to my straining eyes did appear
But an officers escort approaching us near
So graceful and steady they rode as a pack
i knew in a moment it must be old Jack
More rapid than eagles his coursers they came
And he whistled and shouted and called them by name
Now Virginians;
now Georgians;
now Southerners all;
On Stuart; on Pelham; on Hoods Texans tall;
To Horse and to wagon, don’t falter or fall
Now dash away! Dash away!
Dash away all!
As fast as they came, i thought Jack’s kepi would fly
Atop little Sorrel, my tent he rode by
Scattered and hurried, past us they flew
With more officers following-General Beauregard too
And then in a twinkling, i heard from behind
The clatter of sabers and spurs of a kind
As i drew my head and was turning around
Through the back flap, old Jack came with a bound
He was dressed all in gray, from his head to his foot
And his cloths were all tarnished with powder and soot
A bundle of packages was flung on his back
And he looked like a sutler opening his sack
His eyes- how they twinkled! His dimples how merry
His cheeks were like roses, his nose like a cherry
The war had so far not taken it’s toll
And the beard of his chin was black as Dixie coal
A peel of Lemon he held tight in his teeth
Three stars on his collar enclosed in gold wreath
He had a proud face and a little round belly
That shook when he laughed, like a bowl full of jelly
Though not chubby or plump, he was a right jolly old elf
And i laughed when i saw him in spite of myself
a wink of his eye, and a twist of his head
Soon gave me to know i had nothing to dread
He was on the way to Richmond to see the Old Man
And wondered if for Lee, we might have a spare ham
For Old Marse Robert needed food-not for him
But veterans and widows and orphans too slim
The bugler i called without a moments delay
And the men scrambled to ranks, thinking war on the way
but when Lee’s name was mentioned, a cheer did go up
And old Jack’s wagons were filled with a fine Christmas sup
He sprang to his steed, to his men gave a whistle
And away they all flew, like the down of a thistle
But i heard him exclaim, ere they rode out of site
A Dixie Christmas to all, and to all a good night