The So-Called American “Civil War” Was Not Over Slavery

Two days before Lincoln’s inauguration as the 16th President, Congress, consisting only of the Northern states, passed overwhelmingly on March 2, 1861, the Corwin Amendment that gave constitutional protection to slavery. Lincoln endorsed the amendment in his inaugural address, saying “I have no objection to its being made express and irrevocable.” Quite clearly, the North […]

Declaration Of Secession

It’s difficult to say what most Americans commemorate or celebrate on Independence Day nowadays. Many appear to focus on some vague notion of “America.” Others even take to jingoism equating the United States government with the very notion of “freedom.” Lost in all of this is the fact that the Declaration of Independence — the […]

Refighting the ‘Civil’ War

Lincoln Statue, Fasces. Lincoln Memorial. People of sound mind and reasonable judgment in their personal lives take on characters full of unwarranted confidence and intolerant insistence in public. The couple whose son has a “drug problem” wants the government to start a nationwide treatment program. The guy who can’t get his town sanitation department to […]

Lexington and Concord: The Flame Remains Unlit

Today is the 252nd anniversary of the “shot heard ‘round the world” at Lexington and Concord. The British regulars who started the fracas were following an age old government tradition of seizing powder, munitions and property for a pretentious King who had assumed such wide distribution of the tools of resistance should be available only […]

Frédéric Bastiat Is Right (Again)

French economist Frédéric Bastiat was a man far ahead of his time. He was a “classical liberal,” which, today, would identify him as a libertarian. He expanded upon the free-market argument set forth by Adam Smith in 1776. In 1845, the French government levied protective tariffs on scores of items, from sewing needles to locomotives. […]