Overcoming the Instincts of Hive Consciousness

Argentine ants attack a single harvester ant. Photo credit: University of California, Riverside.

Ants are the only animal in the world that humanity can be accurately compared with, so much so that perhaps mankind was influenced by antkind more than any other being. Humans and ants are farmers, warriors, harvesters, thieves and enslavers alike. No other animal behaves like man, except ants, and no other being is as warmongering. Individually we each might be more like a dog or cat, or perhaps we might like to see ourselves as similar in character to a bird, but as a collective, mankind is mostly like antkind.

Antkind and humankind alike have virtually no societal limit to their growth. The environment limits their growth, not their instincts or biological needs. Few other species on the planet operate in this manner. The colony might be hundreds, or millions or billions, and growth will continue. No other species have societies of this proportion, and no other animal behaves the way ants and people might. No other species kills and enslaves each other and no other species practices the complete confrontation of war like humans and ants do.

The harvesting, farming, raising of livestock, enslavement, and war organization that is common between antkind and mankind make us remarkably similar. But perhaps of all our shared traits, the most detrimental similarity is the fact that antkind and mankind both build walls. Perhaps the fact that we build walls is actually the most markedly similar characteristic between us, preceding all other similarities.

Ants and humans build complex dwellings in part as a way to defend the collective, which appears righteous, but it is primarily the result of the near permanent collective state of war.